Grilled Grass-fed Ribeye Steaks

It’s officially summer. Well, it is in my book at least. I don’t care about the solstice, Memorial Day, or school being out. The marker for me is the first grilling event of the season. Last Friday, Senor and I grilled for the first time all year and it was magnificent.

I was especially excited because it was not only our first grilling of the season, but it was the first package of steaks from Blue Gentian Farm that we were cracking into! We recently purchased our annual quantity of beef and this year we went with our favorite farm. Last year, as you may recall, we bought 1/8th of a cow from the Grass Fed Cattle Co. which is a local cooperative of farmers. We definitely enjoyed the experience. The 60lbs of meat lasted us about a year, cut down our grocery bill, and tested me by forcing me to try new cuts. I loved experimenting with the different cuts and definitely learned some things through the process. After a year of eating locally-grown, grass-fed beef, we weren’t looking back. I’ve been so excited to try the new beef…and tell you all about it!

Although we really liked the package from Grass Fed Cattle Co., we decided to switch it up this year. First, if you already have a farmer you know and trust, why go to someone else? Second, I wanted to choose our cuts myself this year. For one thing, with the package we purchased last year, we got a variety of different steaks…three of each kind. That’s not exactly helpful when there are only two of us. We ended up with the spare steaks in the freezer over the winter and eventually I used them but really…it would have been nice to have even numbers of everything. I also wanted to choose more items that I know we will use often (ground beef, chuck roasts, etc.) and also wanted to try a few things that we didn’t get last year (flank steak, beef ribs).

Lucky for me, I just sent a list of what I wanted to Darryle and he sent me back a spreadsheet with the price. We picked it all up from the farmer’s market on a Saturday in early spring. We’ve dipped into our stock of ground beef since then, but the steaks are the first ‘fancy’ cut we’ve tried. They did not disappoint. The beef is pasture-raised Highland cattle which are known for their tender meat in addition to their fuzzy hair. Seriously, these guys are hairballs. A thick layer of hair means they can stay outside year-round. These steaks were amazing. I am so looking forward to grilling out for the rest of the summer!

I’m currently working on a post that talks about what the benefits are of eating pasture-raised animals. I’ve done a lot of research on the subject and there are a lot of reasons that Senor and I eat the way that we do. It’s very trendy at the moment but that’s a terrible reason to do something. Hopefully I can share with you what I’ve learned and help anyone who’s interested in learning more about this popular food movement. There’s a lot of good, hard science behind our reasons.


So, to the bare bones of how to grill the perfect steaks. Start off with a lovely cut of meat. At least 20 minutes before grilling, rub a dry spice rub on either side of the meat. I used a combination of garlic, Mrs. Dash’s onion blend, and a touch of crushed red pepper. I always prefer to grill over charcoal to get that smoky, woody flavor that you can’t get on a gas grill.

To make grilling the most fun, make two easy sides to go along….or make something ahead of time. We had steamed broccoli rabe and roasted sweet potatoes. The sweet potatoes roasted while we were grilling and the broccoli was steamed in under 10 minutes after we were done grilling the steaks. This also gave our beef time for the juices to settle. And since I have 5lbs of blue cheese in my refrigerator, it seemed like a good idea to add some blue cheese on top of our steaks.

We grilled these steaks using all-natural wood charcoal which you can find at Whole Foods or your local co-op. All natural charcoal burns cleaner because no chemicals or ignition fuels are coating the pieces. Instead of briquettes, the charcoal is just chunks of wood in all shapes and sizes. We’ve found that this charcoal lights better, burns hotter, and burns down more completely than standard charcoal. And as a bonus, it’s cheaper! I highly, highly recommend using a chimney starter to start your charcoal, no matter what kind you’re using. A chimney starter costs $9.99 at Target and you will thank the maker that you have one. You simply pour charcoal into the top of the chimney. Stuff crumpled paper underneath, and light the paper. So long as the paper ignites, your charcoal will be hot and glowing in about ten minutes. Just dump it out and start your grilling. So much nicer than having to rely on lighter fluid!

Grilled Grass-Fed Ribeye Steaks

2 high-quality Ribeye steaks

Spices like garlic,  crushed red pepper and a seasoning blend of your choice.

1/2 cup blue cheese crumbles (optional)

Sprinkle your spices lightly over each side of the raw steaks. Let sit for at least 20 minutes to absorb the flavors of the spices.

Once your charcoal is glowing, place your steaks over the hottest part of the coals.

 You want to sear each side of the steak over the high heat to not only lock in the juiciness, but also to give a glorious crust to your meat.

After about 3 minutes, flip your steaks over to sear the other side.

Once both sides have been seared, move the steaks to a cooler part of the grill. Cover the grill and let them cook for 5 minutes.

After 5 minutes, check to see how they’re doing. Senor and I prefer a medium-cooked steak. If you aren’t sure how a steak should feel when it’s ‘done’, you can use a meat thermometer to tell you. 165 is about medium-well while 180 is well-done. If you’re using grass-fed beef, don’t go over 165. The lower fat content means that this beef cooks faster and can dry out more easily if over cooked.

Remove the cooked steaks from the grill and sprinkle on blue cheese.

Cover and let stand for 10 minutes before serving to allow juices to settle.

Roasted Sweet Potatoes

1 large or 2 small sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped

Garlic salt and dried rosemary

Olive oil mist or 1 Tbls. Of olive oil

Add ingredients to a baking dish. Toss to coat. If using an oil mister, toss the potatoes with the spices, then spray lightly with olive oil, tossing to evenly coat on all sides.

Roast in the oven at 375 for 30 minutes.

Grilled Grass-Fed Ribeye Steaks

2 high-quality Ribeye steaks

Spices like garlic,  crushed red pepper and a seasoning blend of your choice.

1/2 cup blue cheese crumbles (optional)

Sprinkle your spices lightly over each side of the raw steaks. Let sit for at
least 20 minutes to absorb the flavors of the spices.

Once your charcoal is glowing, place your steaks over the hottest part of the coals.
You want to sear each side of the steak over the high heat to not only lock in the juiciness,
but also to give a glorious crust to your meat.

After about 3 minutes, flip your steaks over to sear the other side.

Once both sides have been seared, move the steaks to a cooler part of the grill.
Cover the grill and let them cook for 5 minutes.

After 5 minutes, check to see how they’re doing. Senor and I prefer a medium-cooked steak.
If you aren’t sure how a steak should feel when it’s ‘done’, you can use a meat thermometer to tell you.
165 is about medium-well while 180 is well-done. If you’re using grass-fed beef, don’t go over 165.
The lower fat content means that this beef cooks faster and can dry out more easily if over cooked.

Remove the cooked steaks from the grill and sprinkle on blue cheese. Cover and let stand
for 10 minutes before serving to allow juices to settle.

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